Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Why aren't there many decent preachers in America?


Can anyone answer that question?

I mean, it's a big country, but if you look at the Reformed conference line ups the preaching pool is pretty small because the same names appear all the time.

12 comments:

Exiled Preacher said...

Is that why they keep poaching ours? Didn't know that Jimmy Saville was at Together for the Gospel.

mikeb said...

The same reason there aren't many in the UK :)

Today's preachers want to tick ears instead of preach the Word.

Jonathan Hunt said...

FIRE IN THE HOLE!!!!!!!!!!!!

Paul said...

I was going to say what Exiled Preacher said.

Of course, America has loads of good, faithful preachers who could do a fine job at such an event. But they wouldn't draw the numbers- which is also why all the UK gospel partnerships, men's conferences etc. ship in Carson, Piper, Dever, Driscoll etc. for their events.

Andrew B. said...

I actually believe the people who are planning the conferences perhaps are the ignorant ones on this topic. They do pick from the same group of men when I know there are a lot of young reformed preachers out there who have really been gifted by God. Perhaps those who are older and planning these conferences haven't got out of their own box and explored America for good reformed preachers. Perhaps they despise those who are younger...?

Martin Downes said...

Can

Worms

Open

chris e said...

There are many fine preachers who can preach excellent sermons - but who wouldn't necessarily have material that would fit into the lineup of the average conference.

Danny Hyde said...

We like our rock stars, movie stars, sports stars . . . and sadly, in the churches, we want preacher stars. We are a very worldly church here in the U.S. despite books railing against the idols of the culture. There are lots of excellent preachers just in my little denomination of 100+ churches (as there are in many, many others), but 99.9% of American Christians will never hear them because their churches are small, they don't have radio "ministries," they haven't started their own colleges and seminaries, they haven't started their own conferences, etc. What they do is the work of the ministry: preaching, teaching, administering the sacraments, praying, visiting the sick and spiritually needy.

Zac Wyse said...

I totally agree with Paul and Danny. Much of it is the celebrity thing. Trueman's recent article about the Affinity Conference is insightful.

In smaller denominations like the OPC and URC, I'm guessing that the average minister focuses his efforts more on "conferences" like Classis/Presbytery & Synod/General Assembly and contributing to denominational publications that don't go "mainstream".

Todd Pruitt said...

I have to agree with the last few comments. There are, I believe, many more good preachers in the U.S. than perhaps 20 years ago. But, as has already been pointed out, the need to draw a crowd to pay for conferences limits the pool a bit.

Lewis Allen said...

http://reclaimedblogger.blogspot.com/2010/07/for-those-about-to-rock.html

Si Hollett said...

Part of it is that it's easier for pastors at a big church (Piper, Driscoll, Dever, Keller etc) - with additional pastoral staff that can cover them while they are released to serve at conferences or in their study writing - or those in academia (Carson, Mohler) to have the time to write books and to speak at conferences, so become known to people.

We have similar problems with UK preachers, with certain people getting lots of conference speaking. Perhaps also it's a case of being known by conference organisers and thus asked to speak, whereas small names are often not known to the organisers, so remain unknown.

We also have it with worship leaders - what big UK conference doesn't plug the fact that Stuart Townend/Matt Redman/other famous person/several famous people are leading worship there?